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Situated alongside some of Merseyside’s most spectacular countryside, the Bottle & Glass Inn is an attractive and historic pub which dates back at least to the early 19th century.

The Bottle & Glass Inn is an extremely handsome pub which served thirsty visitors for at least 190 years, tucked into the beautiful, green landscape of Rainford. Rainford’s most recognisable landmark, less than 30 minutes walk through attractive countryside from the pub, is the Grade II listed parish Church of All Saints, a handsome building of rock-faced stone dating from the 1870s, which stands at the heart of this picturesque Merseyside village.

This historic pub is ideally located for visitors wanting to explore walks and wildlife, conveniently close to both Siding Lane Nature Reserve, a beautiful and tranquil haven to take in a walk, or simply relax and marvel at the reserve’s wide variety of birds and plants. Less than five miles from the pub, atop Billinge Hill, lies the highest point in Merseyside, and the scenic walk up the hill provides fantastic vistas, with views of Snowdonia, the peak district, and numerous other areas.

Whatever the reason for a visit, the Bottle & Glass Inn is an ideal spot for enjoying tasty traditional pub food, including seasonal specials and relaxing Sunday lunches.

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The Bottle & Glass Inn has stood in the lushly green outskirts of Rainford for at least 190 years, and acts as a gateway to this historic village with a proud industrial heritage. The first recorded mention of Rainford is from 1202, when Ralph de Rainford is said to have attained “part of three oxgangs of land in Rainford, between Blackstone clough and Launclough”. Up until the 14th century, Rainford was ruled by a feudal system, with farming the major occupation. Rainford’s oldest remaining building is Mossborough Hall, was first constructed in 1300, and is a scenic fourty minute walk from the pub. Though the main building on the site is the mid-Victorian incarnation of the hall, the ancient moat of the original house remains on two sides.

The mid-Victorian period also saw the construction begin on the village’s imposing parish church (All Saints), a handsome Grade II listed building standing at the heart of this leafy, traditional village, and a period of continued success for Rainford’s most notable industry – clay pipe making. The production of clay pipes had been brought to northern England in the mid-17th century, but Rainford’s proximity to the port at Liverpool made the village a perfect location for smoking pipe production, as they could be exported to North America and South Africa with relative ease. In 1850, when the industry as a whole had began to lose money, Rainford was at its peak. Once production ceased in the 20th century, coal mining, and later agriculture, took its place.

Heading to or from Rainford, there are lovely walks and stunning views aplenty in every direction. Four miles to the west lies Billinge Hill (affectionately known as Billinge Lump), a beautiful walking route whose top is the highest point in Merseyside – offering views as far afield as Wales and Blackpool. Siding Lane nature reserve is another attractive walking route, conveniently close to Rainford Railway Station, and the reserve offers scenic woodland, and a beautiful array of plants from English bluebells to the rare harts tongue fern. Though Siding Lane is a recent reserve, nearby Knowsley Safari Park is a long-established family attraction, offering the chance to see a huge variety of animals and native British wildlife.

The nearby town of St. Helens, though perhaps not as scenic as Rainford, is a town with a proud sporting and industrial heritage. The former is represented by St. Helens RLFC, who have been English rugby league champions twelve times, and world club champions twice (in 2001 and 2007). Their attractive, modern Langtree Park stadium is just four miles from the Bottle & Glass Inn, and the town’s two major museums, both celebrating local heritage, are even closer. The North West Museum of Road Transport, which contains a Victorian horse drawn carriage, vintage local buses and much more, is handily located on the A570, whilst exciting and educational The World of Glass is less than ten minutes further on, by foot. The town has also excelled in the sciences, producing the Academy Award winning (twice!) sound engineer George Groves, who pioneered the first ‘talking’ motion picture, The Jazz Singer (1927); as well as John William Draper, a photographer who took the first ‘life photographs’ ever, including the first clear photograph of a female face, in 1839-40.

The Grade II* listed Winstanley Hall in nearby Wigan is a major architectural site in the area, and this building still exists in its grand, completed form. Constructed in the 1560s, the core of the original Elizabethan home, with its projecting wings, is clearly visible, though the hall’s gables were replaced in 1818-19 by parapets designed by the esteemed architect Lewis Wyatt, who worked on Cheshire’s Lyme Park estate. The building’s most unique feature, though, is its stable court which includes a varied series of buildings which showcase styles as wide ranging as Norman, Tudor and Baroque. Its gardens offer a picturesque rural space on the edge of the lively town of Wigan.

With Greater Manchester and Liverpool city centre both less than half an hour’s drive away, The Bottle & Glass Inn is also ideally located for relaxing after exploring two of the North West’s most important cultural and historical centres. This attractive pub is also handy for visitors traveling to see Rugby League giants St. Helens RLFC, with the Bottle & Glass Inn close to the club’s Langfield Park ground.

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Bottle & Glass Inn

St Helens Road, Merseyside, WA11 7QT

 
 

Pub Opening Times

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Pub Facilities

  • Beer Garden
  • Car Parking
  • Disabled Facilities
  • Family Friendly
  • Historic Pub
  • Wifi

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